Human Impacts

Carrie Kappel

Carrie Kappel is a marine conservation biologist and community ecologist, she received her Ph.D. from Stanford University. Major themes of her work include quantifying the ways humans depend upon and impact marine species, habitats, and ecosystems; understanding the spatial distribution of ecological and human components of ecosystems in order to inform conservation and management; and developing ways to integrate biophysical and socioeconomic data to support environmental decision-making in coastal ecosystems.

David Williams

Globally, agriculture is the greatest threat to biodiversity and a major contributor to anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Both pressures will increase over coming decades as populations and per capita consumption increase. How we choose to produce food will therefore, to a large extent, determine the state of biodiversity and the wider environment in the 21st Century. I am a conservation scientist interested in finding ways to balance the demands of food production and biodiversity conservation. After a fieldwork-heavy PhD at the University of Cambridge in the UK, supervised by

Marc Mayes

Marc is an Earth scientist who studies land use and climate change effects on terrestrial ecosystems, including carbon, nutrient and water cycling, with a focus on semi-arid developing landscapes in sub-Saharan Africa. His work emphasizes scaling among field and remotely sensed data to understand environmental change at landscape and watershed spatial scales.

Kelly Caylor

Dr. Caylor's research addresses the coupled feedbacks between terrestrial vegetation and surface hydrological dynamics, with a focus on the causes and consequences of spatial patterns in plants and their accompanying root systems within water-limited landscapes. The research approach integrates theoretical development, field observations, and simulation modeling to develop new insight into the complex ecohydrological controls on water balance in water-limited landscapes. Dr.

David Tilman

David Tilman's research focuses on the causes, consequences, and conservation of Earth’s biodiversity, and on how managed and natural ecosystems can sustainably meet human needs for food, energy, and ecosystem services. His current research explores ways to use biodiversity as a tool for biofuel production and climate stabilization through carbon sequestration.

Max Moritz

Much of my work is focused on understanding the dynamics of fire regimes at relatively broad scales and applying this information in ecosystem management. We use quantitative analyses of fire history, examining the relative importance of different mechanisms that drive fire patterns on the landscape, to develop a variety of fire models. Research in my lab ranges from local to global scales, and we have recently published new projections of fire activity under climate change scenarios.

Andrew Plantinga

Andrew Plantinga’s research focuses on the economics of land use, climate change, and forests. Particular emphasis is given to the development of methods for econometrically modeling land-use decisions, the analysis of environmental policies that affect private land-use decisions, and the modeling of land development pressures. A current project, funded by the National Science Foundation, involves the development of econometric land-use models to support an integrated analysis of climate change and water scarcity in the Willamette Basin of Oregon.

Bodo Bookhagen

Understanding Quaternary climate change, geomorphic processes, landscape evolution, and tectonic processes through integrated studies involving cosmogenic radionuclide dating, recent and past climatic records, remote sensing, numerical modeling, and field observations

Timothy DeVries

I work with global ocean models to study the cycling of carbon and nutrients in the ocean. The primary tool I use is a global ocean circulation model constrained by tracer observations.

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